Tsukemon

Meet the Chilly Cousin of Ramen: Tsukemen

noodlebar Noodle Bar 0 Comments

The Japanese cuisine has a few main staples that tend to be the focus for many dishes. Rice and noodles are commonly used to headline or compliment numerous dishes due to their unique ability to take on flavors and add a wonderful texture and foundation for sauces and broths. Ramen is perhaps the most well-known noodle in the cuisine but Tsukemen is an excellent relative for those that love noodles and the Noodle Bar in Phoenix serves up the best.

Tsukemen gained popularity in the 1950’s and is believed to have been developed from the Japanese tradition of eating soba noodles (buckwheat noodles). Soba noodles can be eaten hot or cold. Traditional ramen is served hot, while Tsukemen is served cold. Tsukemen is served with a warm dipping sauce and is commonly referred to as “dipping noodles”. This trend of cold noodles in warm sauce was invented by the founder of Taishoken, one of the very first ramen shops in Japan. The cold noodles are not only easier and quicker to consume but when noodles are chilled for a short time, they become chewy, which is preferred in the Japanese culture. The “al dente” doneness (firm to the bite) is specially reserved for the Italian noodles.

While the popularity began to rise in Japan through the 1960’s and 70’s, it wasn’t until much later that Tsukemen gained its place in the American culinary scene. Now that ramen has been steadily gaining popularity over the past handful of years, ramen restaurants in the U.S. have decided to introduce other popular noodle dishes, with Tsukemen being one of them to appease customers looking for the next great food item.

Now the next time you want to search for an authentic ramen restaurant near me, you will know about the Noodle Bar. At the Noodle Bar in downtown Phoenix, you will find popular noodle dishes like Hakata Ramen, Yaki Soba, Tsukeme, and Pomodoro. To check out their full menu,

The Japanese food has a few main staples that tend to be the focus for many dishes. Rice and noodles are commonly used to headline or compliment numerous dishes due to their unique ability to take on flavors and add a wonderful texture and foundation for sauces and broths. Ramen is perhaps the most well-known noodle in the cuisine but Tsukemen is an excellent relative for those that love noodles and the Noodle Bar in Phoenix serves up the best.

Tsukemen gained popularity in the 1950’s and is believed to have been developed from the Japanese tradition of eating soba noodles (buckwheat noodles). Soba noodles can be eaten hot or cold. Traditional ramen is served hot, while Tsukemen is served cold. Tsukemen is served with a warm dipping sauce and is commonly referred to as “dipping noodles”. This trend of cold noodles in warm sauce was invented by the founder of Taishoken, one of the very first ramen shops in Japan. The cold noodles are not only easier and quicker to consume but when noodles are chilled for a short time, they become chewy, which is preferred in the Japanese culture. The “al dente” doneness (firm to the bite) is specially reserved for the Italian noodles.

While the popularity began to rise in Japan through the 1960’s and 70’s, it wasn’t until much later that Tsukemen gained its place in the American culinary scene. Now that ramen has been steadily gaining popularity over the past handful of years, ramen restaurants in the U.S. have decided to introduce other popular noodle dishes, with Tsukemen being one of them to appease customers looking for the next great food item.

Now the next time you want to search for an authentic ramen restaurant near me, you will know about the Noodle Bar. At the Noodle Bar in downtown Phoenix, you will find popular noodle dishes like Hakata Ramen, Yaki Soba, Tsukeme, and Pomodoro.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *